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Restaurant gift cards top wish list

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Restaurant gift cards top wish list

If you’re not sure exactly what to get someone for Christmas but know their general likes and dislikes, a gift card can be the ideal choice. Say your recipient enjoys great German food or is a beer aficionado, for example. A gift card to Checkers Old Munchen would be an excellent choice. Neiman Marcus was the first store to sell gift cards, but Blockbuster video was the first to display gift cards in their stores. Starbucks introduced reloadable cards in 2001. Gift cards remain a popular holiday gift choice, appearing on the wish lists of 61 percent of people, although women are more likely to ask for gift cards than men (69% vs. 53%). Clothing and accessories were the second-most requested category at 55 percent. According to GiftCards.com, the top three types of gift cards purchased during the winter holiday shopping season are restaurant, general prepaid credit and department store gift cards. Restaurant gift cards topped the list at 41 percent. Visa Gift Cards, MasterCard Gift Cards and American Express Gift Cards followed at 31%, department store gift cards at 28%, coffee shop gift cards at 21% and salon/spa gift cards (11%). While e-gift cards are becoming more popular, with 71 percent of consumers purchasing them in the past year, plastic gift cards remain the top choice, with 89% saying they had purchased at least one plastic gift card in the last year. Fewer than 2% of recipients expect their gift cards to go unused, and total unused gift card volume totals less than 1%. Holiday gift cards allow recipients to take advantage of after-Christmas sales, and 42% of people say they will watch for a good sale or promotion to maximize the value of their cards. Only 20% say they will use their gift cards quickly. For information about purchasing a gift card to Pompano Beach German restaurant Checkers Old Munchen, call (954)...

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German Christmas markets celebrate advent

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German Christmas markets celebrate advent

Halloween is over, Thanksgiving is upon us, and that means Christmas is right around the corner. In Germany, one way to prepare for the celebration of Christmas is the Christmas market, also known as Weihnachtsmarkt  or Christkindlmarket. The Christkindlmarket is a street market held during the four week s preceding Christmas in what’s known as the season of advent. The first mention of December markets can be traced to Vienna, Austria in 1298, while the history of Christmas markets in Germany dates back to the Middle Ages. Traditionally held in the town square, the market has food, drink and seasonal items from open-a ir stalls accompanied by traditional singing and dancing. Popular attractions at Christmas markets often include a nativity scene depicting the birth of Christ, and handcrafted items available for purchase at the markets might include Nussknacker (carved Nutcrackers),  Food specialties include Gebrannte Mandeln (candied, toasted almonds), traditional Christmas cookies (Lebkuchen and Magenbrot), Glühwein, (hot mulled wine), Eierpunsch (an egg-based warm alcoholic drink), Christstollen (Stollen), a bread with candied fruit, and hot Apfelwein. About two million people each year visit famous Christmas markets in Nu remberg and while the Stuttgart and Frankfurt markets attract more than three million visitors. The Christmas market in Dortmund has 300 stalls and boasts a Christmas tree almost 150 feet tall. It attracts more than three and a half million visitors a year. Berlin alone hosts more than 70 Christmas markets. Can’t make it to Europe this holiday season? There are several cities in the United States that host German-style markets, as well. For example, Chicago hosts a yearly in The Loop. The air is filled with live music from carolers while shoppers browse gifts such as cuckoo clocks, nativity sets and glass ornaments. See a list of U.S. Christmas markets in U.S. News and World Report here. Want a German holiday experience even closer to home? Visit Checkers Old Munchen for an authentic German meal during the holiday...

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Checkers Old Munchen is Zagat rated

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Checkers Old Munchen is Zagat rated

Checkers Old Munchen is a Zagat-rated restaurant that offers a little piece of Germany from its location tucked away in the Florida seaside town of Pompano Beach. The restaurant has specialized in serving authentic German cuisine since 1982. But what exactly is a Zagat rating? Zagat is an organization that rates restaurants based on the experiences that diners have there. Diners can submit separate ratings for food, decor, and service at zagat.com. Diners looking for a special experience can look to Zagat ratings to narrow down available dining choices to include only the best. According to the Zagat website, they arrive at this premium selection by collecting and analyzing ratings and reviews from avid diners and by relying on reconnaissance from on-the-ground experts. The data is compiled into lists of the top restaurants within an area and other tools that help you decide where to dine. Nina and Tim Zagat started the ratings system as a hobby in the late 1970s. They were at a dinner party where a friend complained that the local paper’s restaurant reviews were unreliable and didn’t reflect their actual experiences. Instead of relying on the opinion of one newspaper reviewer, Tim Zagat suggested taking a survey of their friends to find out their real experiences at restaurants. They surveyed 200 people about how they felt about 100 local restaurants, not only their food but also décor, service and cost. The resulting list became a hit, and was the start of the Zagat organization that exists today. It was the “original provider of user-generated content” and the precursor to restaurant ratings sites such as Yelp. The ambiance at Checkers Old Munchen will transport you to another place and another time with its warm, welcoming dining room full of character.  Lined with weather wooden shelves with authentic German beer steins,Checkers Old Munchen offer a cozy escape from the everyday world. Come and see why this German restaurant in Pompano is highly-rated by...

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November Fest!!!!

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November Fest!!!!

Sunday November 12th (Veteran’s Weekend) 12:00pm We will be tapping a very special WOODEN KEG of Weihenstephan Festbier shipped directly from Germany. It is only one of three of these special kegs shipped to the United States and the only one in Florida. What a great way to celebrate and honor our amazing Veteran’s – especially the ones who served and were stationed in Germany. We will have brunch specials ranging from Black Forest Ham and cheese Egg Casserole, Thuringer sausages, German breads and pastries and of course Schnitzel a la Holstein. Please make reservations for this very special event and get here early. There is only one keg so it will go...

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German wines not affected by shortage

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German wines not affected by shortage

A nice glass of wine is a welcome addition to your German meal at Checkers Old Munchen restaurant. With German white wine offerings like Kallstadt Riesling, Peter Brum Reisling, Adelseck Spatlese-Reisling, Peter Brum Spatlesle and Selbach Piesporter, as well as reds including Kallstadt Kobnert, Peter Brum Vino Noir, and Kloster Sweet Red Mosel, you’re sure to find something that coordinates well with your meal or dessert. Rhineland-Palatinate, where six of the 13 quality wine regions are situation, produces more than half of Germany’s wine. But there’s bad news for wine producers — and wine drinkers — in other parts of Europe as well as the United States. Expected poor harvests of wine grapes in Spain, Italy and France along with damage from wildfires in California are causing experts to predict a wine shortage in 2018. According to CNN Money, the three European countries that produce more than half the world’s wine, Spain, Italy and France, are suffering from poor harvests because bad weather in April damaged the grapes. The European Commission said the harvest will be the worst in 35 years. The United States, which is the fourth-largest producer of wine in the world, suffered some losses in the devastating fires in Sonoma Valle. Although the fires happened after the harvest was 90 percent complete, any remaining grapes could be tainted by smoke or otherwise un-harvestable. Analysts also fear the shortages will lead to higher prices, with a rise in cost to consumers of about 10 percent predicted. The world’s biggest wine producer, Italy, will see production fall 21 percent to just above 4 billion liters, while production in Spain and France will drop 15 percent. The vineyards suffered damage from hailstorms, frost and summer droughts, per CNN. Many grapes ripened early and are smaller than usual. According to France 24, the French are the leading consumers of wine in the European Union, followed by Italy, Germany, the UK and...

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Octoberfest starts in September in Munich

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In the United States, many people consider Octoberfest to be a month-long celebration dedicated to drinking German beer. But Octoberfest in Germany actually starts late in September and lasts for about three weeks. On the second-to-last Saturday in September, the mayor of Munich taps the first barrel of  beer at the Schottenhamel Tent, declaring, “O’zapft is” which means “it’s open.”It goes until the first Sunday of October following German reunification day, which is October 5. Oktoberfest originally started as a celebration of the marriage of Prince Ludwig and Princess Therese on October 12, 1810. Everyone in Munich was invited to attend the festival, which took place outside the city gates in the fields. The party was so well-attended and enjoyed, the townspeople asked their king to make it an annual event. The event was eventually moved to a September start for better weather. According to BucketList Events, more than 7 million people attended Octoberfest festivities in Munich in 2015, and this year marked the 210th anniversary of the festivities. During the festival, revelers come from around the world to consume more than 1 million gallons of Bavarian beer at 14 main beer tents. The six largest tents host as many as 12,000 visitors a day, per BucketList. Only six breweries serve beer on the Octoberfest grounds. The Munich festival also features carnival rides and games, a parade on the opening weekend with more than 7,000 costumed participants, and an open-air concert with more than 400 musicians. Oktoberfest is also about Bavarian culture, and visitors are encouraged to dress in the traditional lederhosen for men (shorts with straps) and dirndl (circle) skirts for women. Oktoberfest is also about hearty German food — you don’t want to drink all that beer on an empty stomach. If you’re unable to travel to Germany, don’t worry — you can experience the best of German food and beer without a passport at Checkers Old Munchen German Restaurant in Pompano...

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Show your employer some love on Boss’s Day

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It’s Boss’s Day, a great day to take your boss out for a drink or a nice meal at Checkers Old Munchen to show your appreciation for everything he or she does to make your work life more productive and enjoyable. Boss’s Day is celebrated each year on Oct. 16, or if that date falls on a weekend, on the working day which is closest. The holiday was suggested in 1958 by Patricia Bays Haroski, a secretary for State Farm Insurance Company in Deerfield, Illinois. Since she was working for her father, she chose his birthday as the day for the celebration of Boss’s Day. Ms. Haroski registered the designation with the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, then in 1962, Illinois Governor Otto Kerner officially recognized Boss’s Day in the state. Although it’s not an official government holiday across the United States, it is recognized by many as a way for employees to show their appreciation to their leaders. This day is observed not only in the United States but also in Canada, India, South Africa and Lithuania. Often, workers will sign a card or write a note to their boss expressing their appreciation. Sometimes, they will be moved to do something a little more, like include a box of chocolates. The luckiest bosses will be treated to lunch or drinks by one or more of their employees. Not every workplace encourages the celebration of Boss’s Day. Some feel that since bosses generally make more money than their employees, they shouldn’t expect employees to give them gifts. However, appreciation doesn’t have to be expensive, and saying thank you in some way is rarely a bad idea. If you do decide to show your employer some love on Boss’s Day, the ambiance at Checkers Old Muchen, a Zagat-rated restaurant, will transport you to another place and time with a vibe that is warm, welcoming and full of character. It’s a cozy escape from your normal workday and a great way to say...

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The top 10 German foods you should try

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    German food is rich and delicious, and goes far beyond bratwurst and pretzels (and beer). Here’s a list of the top 10 German foods as compiled by Expatica.com, a website for English-speaking people living abroad: Rouladen– This dish is made by wrapping thinly-sliced meat around a filling then braising it. The meat can be beef, pork or veal, and the filling might include bacon, onions pickles and mustard. Kasespatzle – These noodles are made from wheat flour and egg are often served topped with cheese.Sometimes the dough is mixed with cherries or apples liver or sauerkraut. Rote grutze – This red fruit pudding is made from black or red currants, raspberries, strawberries or cherries and served with cream or ice cream. Eintopf – Ingredients may vary for this stew, but most recipes include a broth, vegetables, potatoes and meat such as pork, beef, chicken fish. Sauerbraten – This pickled pot roast is made from meat marinated in wine, vinegar, spices and herbs for up to 10 days to make it tender. Kartoffelpuffer, Klosse and Bratkartoffeln – Potato is the main ingredient in these three dishes, which are respectively pancakes, dumplings, and potatoes that are boiled then fried with bacon and onions. Brezel – The German word for pretzel. You can’t think of German food without including a soft pretzel washed down with a good pilsner. Schwarzwalder Kirschtorte – This delicious Black Forest cake features layers of rich chocolate cake, cherries and whipped cream topped with chocolate shavings. Schnitzel and apple strudel – A schnitzel is a thin, boneless cutlet of meat coated in breadcrumbs such as a Wiener Schnitzel, which is made of veal. It’s often served with apple strudel, a pastry filled with flavored with sugar, cinnamon and raisins and topped with icing or powdered sugar. Wurst – Bratwurst is the most popular of these fried sausages made from ground pork and spices. Many of these German classics and more are available from Checkers Old Munchen German restaurant in Pompano. Check out the menu...

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Take a beer tour to train for International Beer Day

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  International Beer Day is set for Friday, August 4, 2018, a mere 10 months away. So why are we telling you about it now? Because you might want to get some training in before the big day by completing a beer tour at Checkers Old Munchen German restaurant in Pompano. According to the official International Beer Day website, the brew holiday is a global celebration of beer with three goals: Gathering with friends to enjoy beer, celebrating the dedicated men and women who brew and serve beer, and bringing the world together by celebrating the beers of all nations and cultures. International Beer Day, first celebrated in 2008, happens each year on the first Friday in August, and is celebrated in more than 200 cities around the world. And heads up, craft beer hipsters: Beer aficionados are not a new phenomenon. A cold (or warm) brew is a beverage that has been loved around the world for centuries. Many ancient Egyptians, for example enjoyed about 4 liters a day. Ancient Babylonia was a scary place to be a brewer; if a brewer made a bad batch, he was drowned in it. And Vikings believed that one benefit of their afterlife in Valhalla would be access to a giant goat whose udders were full of beer. Now back to the beer tour at Checkers Old Munchen German restaurant in Pompano. If you take the tasting “tour” of more than 30 German beers, you’re sure to become an expert on the subject. On your first visit, you’ll be given a German Beer Tour Passport that lists all of the 30 varieties. Your passport will be waiting each time you visit, and will be used to track your journey stein by stein. Once you have tasted all 30 beers, you will be declared a Deutsche Bier Meister (German Beer Master) and awarded a plaque, a T-shirt and Das Boot drinking mug. So, start training. The celebration begins...

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Bavarian Man Breaks His Own World Record Beer Carry

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Bavarian Man Breaks His Own World Record Beer Carry

Think you can place your beer carrying skills in a record book? What would it take to become the champion of the carry? Try putting in about 200 hours of training, and lifting about 150 pounds in a dead carry… “Oliver Struempfel spent months in the gym training to attempt carrying 29 beer steins at once in an event in Bavaria during the lead-up to Oktoberfest. The rules were simple: He needed to carry the steins 40 meters, and they had to arrive at their destination with less than 10 percent of the beer spilled on their journey…” [ Read more here...

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Checkers Old Munchen

2209 E Atlantic Blvd, Pompano Beach, FL 33062
Pompano Beach, FL
33062